Saturday, March 17, 2018

Online depression intervention tool found effective in adolescent mothers

Researchers from the University of Louisville found that using an Internet-based depression intervention tool program found effective in improving treatment rates of adolescent depressed mothers. This study is published in journal Archives of Women's Mental Health.

Roughly half of the 400,000 adolescents 18 and younger who give birth annually in the United States experience depressive symptoms, but less than 25 percent follow referrals for depression evaluation and treatment, according to the study.

Internet-based depression tool consisted of a website with videos of mothers describing their experience with management of postpartum depression. Research study involved more than 200 subjects and findings showed that intervention changed attitudes and helped adolescent depressed mothers to seek mental health and depression treatment.

This research was lead by M. Cynthia Logsdon, Ph.D., W.H.N.P.-B.C., University of Louisville School of Nursing professor who said,
Untreated postpartum depression hinders a mother's relationship with her child, her functioning at work and school, mothering skills and development. The condition also can harm a baby's development and attachment to the mother.
Reference: Logsdon, M. Cynthia, John Myers, Jeff Rushton, Jennifer L. Gregg, Allan M. Josephson, Deborah Winders Davis, Kyle Brothers, Kristin Baisch, Anissa Carabello, Krista Vogt, Kayla Jones, and Jennifer Angermeier. "Efficacy of an Internet-based Depression Intervention to Improve Rates of Treatment in Adolescent Mothers." Archives of Womens Mental Health, 2017. doi:10.1007/s00737-017-0804-z.

Research funding: National Institute of Health.

Adapted from press release by the University of Louisville.

No comments:

Also read